Fang-Ntumu figure
Height: 21.5" Width: 5.25" Depth: 3.5"

THIS OBJECT IS NO LONGER IN MY COLLECTION

Old and authentic Fang objects of any kind are rare and expensive. Fang objects have been highly venerated by
collectors since they were first introduced to the market in the early 1900's. Paul Guillaume was largely responsible, in
my opinion, for the initial fascination by collectors for Fang objects, and they have steadily remained as very sought
after objects and objects that command high prices in the high end market place. This fact has caused these objects
to be made specifically for the collecting market for many, many years.

That being said, I am really not sure about the authenticity of this figure. However, one thing I really enjoy about this
figure is the face, it is wonderful in my opinion. I also enjoy the unique placement of the hands on this figure.

The ensemble of Fang peoples practice a cult devoted to ancestor lineages, the bieri, whose aim is to both protect
themselves from the deceased and to recruit their aid in matters of daily life. This familial cult does not monopolize the
Fang’s religious universe, for it coexists with other beliefs and rituals of a more collective character. It is the bieri, or
ancestor sculpture, which has most obviously given rise to the making of remarkable wooden sculpture. The statuary
of the Fang can be classified into three main groups: heads on long necks, half-figures and full figures, standing or
seated. Carved with great simplicity, at the same time they exhibit a high degree of sophistication in the coordination of
bulbous forms. The neck is often a massive cylindrical form. The arms have various positions: hands clasped in front
of the body (sometimes holding an object); held in front of the chest or attached to it; hands resting on the knees in
the seated figures. The navel is often exaggerated into a cylindrical form. Legs are short, stunted. Usually there is a
domed, wide forehead and the eyebrows often form arcs with the nose. The eyes are often made of metal roundlets.
To see additional Fang byeri heads and figures
click here
to go to my Fang style comparison page in my
You Be the Judge section of my website
Map source: http://www.ethno.unizh.ch/csfconference/files/papers/